Welcome to the Nano Institute!


All_tiny.jpgexternal image 8425_1118723774384_1415721322_30275913_4310430_s.jpg

NDeRC NANO facilitators

(left to right) Rebecca Quardokus, Lynda Rose, Michael Crocker, Patrick Mooney, Valerie Goss, Sharon Brandt

Participants Wikipages

Ken Andrzejewski
Walt Buras
Dave Dobrzykowski
Jeanne DuBois
Michelle Havens
Amy Hively
Gail Horein
Bryan Nowakowski
Cindy Skoczylas
Erin Wagner
Michael Wagner
Dan Witt

Videos From Monday

Powers of 10
Intro to Nanoscience
What is Nano?

Scale Bar Game




Presentations










Becky's Presentations from Monday, July 26, 2010

Introduction to nanotechnology

Introduction to Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM)

Summary of NANO K-6 Institute and a week in the classroom


Becky's Presentations from Thursday, July 29, 2010







Resources From Tuesday

Classroom Activities for the Galileo Telescope and Optics

Resources From Wednesday

Download Classroom Magazines at Nanooze!

Resources From Thursday

Quantum Dot Cellular Automata

Resources From Friday

Great book for learning about journaling with students:
Campbell, Brian, and Lori Fulton. Science Notebooks: Writing About Inquiry. Portsmouth: Heinemann, 2003. Print.

Nanotechnology and Paint

Does anyone know if these resources are good? They can be found on Amazon.
Nanotechnology for Grades 1-6+: Introducing Nan and Bucky dog by Andrea Harmer
Nanotechnology (Cool Science) by Rebecca L. Johnson
MEMS & Nanotechnology for Kids by Marlene Bourne

Schedule for the Week
Time
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
8:30-8:45
Welcome
Welcome
Welcome
Welcome
Welcome
8:45-10:15
Intro
Optics
AFM Demo
STM Demo
Wrap-Up
10:15-10:30
Break
Break
Break
Break
Break
10:30-Noon
Scale
SEM
AFM Hands-On
STM Hands-On
Symp. Prep
Noon-1:00
Lunch
Lunch
Lunch
Lunch
Lunch
1:00-3:00
Comm.
Lab Tours
Pedagogy
Symp. Prep
Symposium


Pre-Survey

Post-Survey

optical 1600's
SEM 1935
AFM 1986
STM 1981
cm to 500 nm
20 mm to 1 nm cart ( 100nm)
125 microns to 1 nm

portable
-70 micrometers --.21nm

Resolution: .08nm
500 nm to.5nm
z - range
can scan 200 nm max
normal scan-20 nm scan max
range.01nm-min
resolution <0.1 nm
Advantages



Big fields
wide range of samples
colors faster simpler to operate
better resolution than opt lithography
view everyday objects higher res. than optical large scan range
view any material
change tip to study different properties
vary mode (contact or tapping)
scan liquids
atomic resolution
manipulate atoms
Disadvantages



resolution
viewing only only visible light
vacuum (samples are dead)
sample preparation
no color
time to scan
no color
fragile tip
can damage surface
time to scan
surface conductive
must be flat
can damage surface
time to scan
Type of samples



mobile sample
bigger than 500 nm biological sample
machined part(materials study)
biological sample must be dead needs special preparation everything between optical and AFM & STM
topographical info
non conductive material things too large for STM
size
interaction between a group of tip atoms and a group of surface atoms
overview of BIG surface
Molecules
atoms
surface interactions
interaction between one tip atom and one surface atom
vibrations matters least
---------------------à
-----------------------à
vibrations matter most